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December 14, 2009updated Feb 08, 2013

Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond To Be Displayed At National Museum of Natural History

By Pardhasaradhi Gonuguntla

WASHINGTON, D.C. — One of the world’s most extraordinary gemstones, the Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond, will be on display at the National Museum of Natural History Jan. 28, 2010, through Aug. 1, 2010, according to a press release received by Elite Traveler. This will be the first time it has been shown to the public in more than 50 years. A diamond of rare deep-blue color and weighing 31.06 carats, the Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond will be presented in the National Gem Collection in the Hall of Geology, Gems and Minerals, where the renowned Hope Diamond is on permanent view. The Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond has long been rumored to have originated from the same diamond mine in India as the Hope Diamond. Smithsonian scientists will explore this mystery while the diamond is in their care.

“The Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond is an object of intrigue and legend, certainly one of the great gemstones of the world,” said Jeffrey Post, curator of the National Gem Collection. “We are thrilled to present this icon of history—and gemology—to the public for the first time since it was displayed at the Brussels World’s Fair in 1958.”

The Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond has an illustrious history, dating back to 1664 when it was given by Philip IV of Spain to his daughter, the Infanta Margarita Teresa, upon her engagement to Emperor Leopold I of Austria. (In 1722, the diamond passed to the Wittelsbachs, members of the ruling House of Bavaria. It was here that the diamond derived its name.) After World War I, Bavaria became a republic and the crown jewels of the House of Wittelsbach were eventually sold at Christie’s in 1931 by auction.

In an incident that has never fully been explained, the Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond disappeared before the auction and was replaced by a worthless piece of blue, cut glass. The actual Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond resurfaced in Belgium in 1951 and was eventually displayed—without attribution—at the “World Exhibition” in Brussels in 1958. The diamond was correctly identified in 1962 by Joseph Komkommer, a Belgian gem expert.

In December 2008, the 35.56-carat stone was acquired by Laurence Graff, at auction in London. Mr. Graff’s expertise in gemology enabled him to see the potential in re-polishing the stone, bringing to it more life and color while at the same time making it internally flawless. The process brought the stone to its current weight of 31.06 carats. Throughout the very delicate process of re-polishing this famous stone, great care and attention was taken to retain its original features. Since then, it has achieved the top certification of internally flawless, type Ilb (the rarest), deep-blue. According to the Gemological Institute of America, the diamond “… is the largest Flawless or Internally flawless, Fancy Deep Blue, Natural Color we have graded to date…”

“To have two of the world’s most historical stones—the Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond and the Hope Diamond—displayed together, is a testament to the stones’ history and importance,” said Laurence Graff, Chairman of Graff Diamonds International Ltd. “I believe the diamond’s appearance at the Smithsonian will represent another significant chapter in its remarkable history.”

As a rare blue diamond from the 17th century, the Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond’s properties suggest a possible link to the same mines in India that produced the 45.52-carat Hope Diamond, which is recognized as the most near-perfect example of a blue diamond in existence. “During the Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond’s residence at the museum, special tests will be conducted by our research team in the Smithsonian’s state-of-the-art laboratories to determine whether these two gemstones share a provenance,” said Post. “Whether or not the Hope Diamond and the Wittelsbach-Graff Diamonds are related, the most important thing for our visitors is that they will have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to view the two most extraordinary blue diamonds in the world.”

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The House of Graff is famous for the most fabulous jewels in the world. The name symbolizes rarity, beauty, excellence, and above all the best quality craftsmanship and diamonds. A diamond company extraordinaire, Graff produces polished diamonds from the rough sourced from mines around the world, making it one of the world’s leading diamond companies. Tens of thousands of carats of rough diamonds are cut and polished by a team of over 300 in Graff’s diamond cutting facility based in Johannesburg, South Africa. Each jewel is unique from the perfectly cut diamond to the magnificent hand finished piece. Laurence Graff, Chairman, has set an unsurpassed standard of excellence and innovation in the world of diamonds and fine jewelry. It has been said that more important gem quality diamonds have passed through his hands than any other dealer. More information about The House of Graff is available at www.graffdiamonds.com or by calling 212.355.9292.

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, located at 10th Street and Constitution Avenue N.W. in Washington, D.C., welcomed more than 7 million visitors in 2008, making it the most visited museum in the United States. The museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., except Dec. 25, and admission is free. More information about the museum is available at www.mnh.si.edu or by calling (202) 633-1000, TTY (202) 633-5285.

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